Udemy Audio Engineering Basics of Compression TUTORIAL
Soft / Video Lessons 8-12-2015
Udemy Audio Engineering Basics of Compression TUTORIAL
Using a compressor and understanding compression is one of the hardest things for entry audio engineers to grasp. With so many different compressors and compressors types its not hard to see why people struggle with compression. Compression is critical to getting good mixes in music today, and without a proper knowledge of compressors and how to use them your mixes can easily turn thin and lifeless. Compressors can add color to tracks, crush drums, smooth out vocals, and add weight to a bass. Compressors can add to an track, or it can take away. For example, with a compressor you add punch to a kick drum, you can take the punch away. It all depends on how you use it. And there are many, many ways to use a compressor. Using compression properly will help improve your mixes by keeping dynamics controlled.

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https://www.udemy.com/audio-engineering-basics-of-compression
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